RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19

first_img March 3, 2021 Find out more Organisation IndiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abuses Covid19ImprisonedJudicial harassment April 27, 2021 RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 Help by sharing this information News The New Delhi-based journalist Siddique Kappan, chained to a hospital bed for almost a week, is in a critical condition and Reporters Without Borders (RSF) demands that the Uttar Pradesh provincial authorities order his immediate release. As reported by RSF, Kappan was arrested in October 2020 while travelling from New Delhi to Uttar Pradesh to report on the alleged gang-rape and killing of a 19-year-old woman from the Dalit caste (formerly known as “untouchables”) in Hathras. He was charged with sedition and could face life imprisonment. India lies in 142nd place out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2021 World Press Freedom Index. News “The unjustified detention of Siddique Kappan has turned into the worst of nightmares to the point where it is now a matter of life or death,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. Indian journalist wrongly accused of “wantonly” inaccurate reporting The news site Medianama reported that the authorities had requested the censorship of dozens of posts by journalists on the social media sites, on the grounds that this was necessary to prevent the spread of rumours. RSF_en India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media On 21 April he collapsed in prison and was taken to KM Medical College Hospital in the northern city of Mathura after testing positive for Covid-19. There he has been handcuffed to his bed and denied proper food and access to the toilet.center_img IndiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abuses Covid19ImprisonedJudicial harassment The Covid-19 pandemic has spread alarmingly in India in recent days, with a catastrophic increase and hospitals overwhelmed. To deflect criticism, the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi asked Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to remove posts about the health crisis and the platforms complied with the requests.  Follow the news on India to go further The journalist’s lawyer Wills Mathews provided RSF with a copy of a letter he sent to the head of the Indian Supreme Court requesting that his client be removed from hospital and returned to Mathura prison where he was likely to receive better treatment. It was a matter of humanitarian urgency, according to the lawyer. Kappan has diabetes and a heart condition. News “We ask the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, Yogi Adityanath, to order the immediate release of the reporter, who should never have been arrested for simply trying to do his job. If not, and he does not survive, the provincial authorities will bear responsibility for his death.” June 10, 2021 Find out more Censorship In rural India, journalists face choice between covering pandemic and survival Receive email alerts News Members of the Kerala Union of Working Journalists held a vigil (right) in their southern State of Kerala where Siddique Kappan is from, in order to ask for his release from an Uttar Pradesh jail, located up North (photos: Kaumudi – India Today). February 23, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Don’t reverse course on press freedom, RSF urges Ethiopia

first_img News July 22, 2019 Don’t reverse course on press freedom, RSF urges Ethiopia Help by sharing this information Photo : FBC Organisation Follow the news on Ethiopia News Responding to questions from journalists earlier this month about reporting by Temesgen Desalegn, the editor of the weekly Feteh, defence ministry spokesman Gen. Mohammed Tesema called him “useless” and said: “We will not be responsible for any member of the armed forces who feels aggrieved by this report and takes a measure against Temesgen.”He added: “We will be taking action legally against reporting by media houses that tarnish the reputation of the armed forces.”“We condemn these threats, which have come amid a worrying surge in press freedom violations after remarkable progress since last year,” said Arnaud Froger, the head of RSF’s Africa desk. “We urge the government and security forces not to reverse course on press freedom. Recourse to intimidation, arrests and online censorship will not help to make the media more professional or, even less so, encourage an environment in which the media can fully participate in democratization and peace in Ethiopia.”After taking office in April 2018, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s government released all detained journalists, allowed hundreds of  previously banned news websites and other media outlets to operate, and repeatedly pledged to respect free speech and press freedom. But, amid mounting ethnic tension, it has been sending disturbing signals in recent months.The Internet was disconnected twice for several days at a time last month,­ the first time beginning on 10 June on the official grounds of preventing cheating during end of school year exams, and then again beginning on 22 June in response to armed clashes in the Amhara region, which the government described as a coup attempt.In the wake of this alleged coup attempt, Asrat TV journalists Berihun Adane and Getachew Ambachew were arrested under the 2009 terrorism law, which was widely used in the past to arbitrarily detain journalists and bloggers. It has not so far been possible to determine if they were arrested in connection with their journalism.Three journalists were briefly arrested in May in connection with their reporting. Mesganew Getachew of Ethiopis was arrested after a report about the demolition of a home in the capital, Addis Ababa. Radio Ahadu’s Tamerat Abera was arrested for allegedly spreading “false information” about the ethnic majority Oromo people. And Getya Yalew was arrested after visiting Tamerat in prison.Ethiopia is ranked 110th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index after jumping 40 places in single year, more than any other country in the 2019 Index. RSF condemns NYT reporter’s unprecedented expulsion from Ethiopia Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is concerned about a recent wave of press freedom violations in Ethiopia, including an army general’s direct threat against a journalist, the arrests of several journalists and frequent Internet blackouts, all of which have set back the significant progress that Ethiopia began making more than a year ago. to go further Newscenter_img News EthiopiaAfrica Condemning abusesProtecting journalistsOnline freedoms Freedom of expression May 21, 2021 Find out more Journalist attacked, threatened in her Addis Ababa home Ethiopia arbitrarily suspends New York Times reporter’s accreditation RSF_en EthiopiaAfrica Condemning abusesProtecting journalistsOnline freedoms Freedom of expression Receive email alerts May 18, 2021 Find out more February 10, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Call for a charter to protect journalists as government troops take over

first_img News Receive email alerts SomaliaAfrica Radio reporter gunned on city street in central Somalia News Help by sharing this information RSF_en SomaliaAfrica February 24, 2021 Find out more News As troops loyal to the transitional federal government took control of almost all of Somalia today, Reporters Without Borders and its partner organisation in Somalia, the National Union of Somali Journalists (NUSOJ), called on the government and all other parties to the conflict to respect the work of journalists.Making their appeal five days after the UN security council’s unanimous adoption on 23 December of Resolution 1738 on the protection of journalists in armed conflicts, the two organisations called on the Somali authorities to undertake to respect a four-point charter that would demonstrate its desire to respect democratic rules and establish an open and pluralistic society in Somalia.“Somali and foreign journalists have paid a high price in the erratic war that has been tearing the country apart for the past 15 years,” the organisations said. “With an internationally-recognised government today proclaiming its desire to establish a democracy, it would be incomprehensible if the ordeal for journalists were to continue. Now that Mogadishu and almost all of the rest of the country has been taken, there must be a clear change in the climate, one that allows the public to receive news and information in a proper manner.”Reporters Without Borders and the NUSOJ call on the Somali transitional federal government to undertake to respect, and ensure respect for, the following four principles:1. Protect the work of local and foreign journalists covering events taking place in Somalia, this to include giving clear instructions to the troops maintaining order that journalists must be treated as civilians.2. Guarantee media pluralism in Somalia, ensuring in particular that no retaliatory measures are taken against news media and journalists that might be perceived as not being in favour of the transitional federal government.3. Facilitate the access of the local and foreign media to information by ensuring that the troops loyal to the transitional federal government cooperate with journalists.4. Give priority to dialogue with media organisations in cases of disputes with the press. News Organisation to go further March 2, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Somalia RSF and NUSOJ call for release of a journalist held in Somalia’s Puntland region December 28, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Call for a charter to protect journalists as government troops take over RSF requests urgent adoption of moratorium on arrests of journalists As troops loyal to the transitional federal government took control of almost all of Somalia today, Reporters Without Borders and its partner organisation in Somalia, the National Union of Somali Journalists (NUSOJ), called on the government and all other parties to the conflict to respect the work of journalists. January 8, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Authorities shelve probe into Cherkasova’s murder without ever finding any clues

first_img “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown Organisation Reporters Without Borders today condemned the decision by the Minsk prosecutor’s office, announced on 27 December, to suspend the investigation into the 16 October 2004 murder of Veronika Cherkasova. Investigators never found any clues as to the identity of the murderer and yet never explored the possibility that she was killed because of her work as a journalist. The Belarusian authorities always limited themselves to suspecting Cherkasova’s relatives. Reporters Without Borders today condemned the decision by the Minsk prosecutor’s office, announced on 27 December, to suspend the investigation into the 16 October 2004 murder of Veronika Cherkasova, an investigative journalist with the independent trade union weekly Solidarnost.Investigators never found any clues as to the identity of the murderer and yet never explored the possibility that she was killed because of her work as a journalist, despite calls from Reporters Without Borders and her family that they should do this.“The decision to drop the investigation and shelve the case leaves little hope that the culprit will ever be identified,” Reporters Without Borders said. “One more case that will never be solved, like the cases of fellow journalists Dmitri Zavadski, Mikhailo Kolomiets and Vassili Grodnikov. Belarus is a country where the murders of journalists are not investigated.”The Belarusian authorities always limited themselves to suspecting Cherkasova’s young son, Anton Filimonov, who was the last known person to leave her home, where she was killed. The boy fled to Moscow to escape the medical examination demanded by the Minsk prosecutor’s office, which threatened to commit him to a psychiatric clinic. The victim’s mother, Diana Cherkasova, accused the authorities of hounding her family.The survival of Cherkasova’s newspaper, Solidarnost, has meanwhile been threatened by a decision by the state company that has a monopoly on newspaper distribution, announced on 30 November, to stop delivering it to news stands.At a news conference in April at the headquarters of the Belarus Association of Journalists (BAJ), Solidarnost editor Alexandre Starikevitch voiced amazement that investigators never linked Cherkasova’s murder to the research she was doing into the Belarusian government’s arms sales to Iraq. He said he suspected the authorities were involved in her murder and were trying to cover it up by ruling out any possibility of a connection with her work. BelarusEurope – Central Asia BelarusEurope – Central Asia RSF_en Follow the news on Belarus to go further RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” News June 2, 2021 Find out more News News News December 30, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Authorities shelve probe into Cherkasova’s murder without ever finding any clues May 28, 2021 Find out more May 27, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Iran frees Parvaz, Libya frees four other journalists

first_img June 15, 2020 Find out more May 18, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Iran frees Parvaz, Libya frees four other journalists Follow the news on Bahrain Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives German spyware company FinFisher searched by public prosecutors News LIBYA Reporters Without Borders hails today’s release of four foreign journalists in Tripoli. An AFP reporter said they “appeared tired but in good health” when they arrived at the Rixos Hotel in Tripoli.Three of these journalists were captured by pro-Gaddafi forces near Brega on 5 April. They are Clare Morgana Gillis, a US reporter covering Libya for The Atlantic magazine’s website and other US media, James Foley, a US reporter working for GlobalPost.com, Stars and Stripes and Al-Jazeera, and Manu Brabo, a Spanish freelance photographer. The fourth is British journalist Nigel Chandler.Libyan government spokesman Moussa Ibrahim had announced yesterday that four journalists would be released. However, while naming the first three, he had indicated that the fourth would be Anton Hammerl, a South African freelance photographer who disappeared the same day.Today Ibrahim told journalists there had been a “mix-up” about the identity of the four journalists being released, adding that Hammerl had not been located.According to the information obtained by Reporters Without Borders, all four journalists appeared before an administrative court yesterday on charges of entering the country illegally, for which they were fined 200 dinars (122 euros) and were given a suspended sentence of one year in prison.Since the start of the uprising in Libya on 16 February, many journalists have entered the country across the Egyptian border without permission to cover developments from rebel-held areas. In comments on 21 February, Muammar Gaddafi said he regarded such journalists as Al-Qaeda accomplices and as “stray dogs.” At the same time, the government has invited foreign journalists to Tripoli to relay its own propaganda.The following journalists are still held:- Kamel Ataloua, a British journalist working for Al-Jazeera who has been held since the start of March.- Lotfi Ghars, a journalist with Tunisian and Canadian dual nationality working for Al-Alam TV, who has been held since 16 March.- Matthew VanDyke, an American freelancer who has been missing since 12 March.- Six Libyan journalists. October 14, 2020 Find out more OMAN Reporters Without Borders is very disturbed by the course that events are taking in Oman, noting in particular that the Tamol.net (www.tamol.net) news website removed all of its videos of protests a few days after the Al-Hara Al-Omaniyya online forum was blockedThe authorities have for several days been cracking down hard on the anti-government demonstrations taking place in several parts of the country including Muscat, the nearby port city of Sohar and the southern city of Salalah (1,000 km south of the capital). The protests and the repression are now getting virtually no news coverage. SYRIA Reporters Without Borders hails Syrian journalist and activist Malak Al-Shanawani’s release on 15 May. She was held for six days. Receive email alerts News Newscenter_img BahrainMiddle East – North Africa Tenth anniversary of Bahraini blogger’s arrest BAHRAIN Frederik Richter, a German journalist who has been the Reuters correspondent in Manama since 2008, left Bahrain yesterday at the behest of the government, which has accused him of biased reporting. In a dispatch published by Reuters yesterday, he described a country transformed by fear.The government has been accusing the international media of supporter Bahrain’s anti-government protesters ever since they began demonstrating in February. Many foreign reporters have been denied visas or turned back at Manama airport.As a result of the government crackdown, Bahrainis began refusing to talk Richter to him by phone, preferring discreet personal meetings. He had to use clandestine methods to meet his sources as both Bahrainis and foreign residents working for the government thought their phones were tapped. Richter added that he thought King Hamad’s announcement of the lifting of the state of emergency on 1 June has come too late for a country that has been traumatized by the government’s handling of the crisis. BahrainMiddle East – North Africa March 17, 2021 Find out more Organisation Help by sharing this information News IRAN Reporters Without Borders is relieved by the release of the Al-Jazeera journalist Homa Dorothy Parvaz, who had disappeared on arriving at Damascus airport on 29 April. Parvaz, who has US, Canadian and Iranian nationality, arrived this morning in the Qatari capital of Doha on a flight from Tehran. The Syrian embassy in Washington had announced in press release on 11 May that the Syrian authorities had deported Parvaz to Iran on 1 May. But Iranian foreign minister Ali Akbar Salehi told Iran’s official news agency IRNA on 14 May that Iran had “no information” about her.The Seattle Times today quotes her brother as saying he spoke to her after her arrival in Doha. She told him that, while in Tehran, she was held in solitary confinement in Evin prison, interrogated by the authorities and denied any contact with her family. He did not say whether she mentioned being mistreated.Tehran prosecutor-general Abbas Jafari Dolatabadi has meanwhile been quoted by IRNA as saying she was held for “verification” of her passport. She is expected to return to Canada tomorrow. to go further RSF_en last_img read more

International community urged to rally to defence of Venezuela’s media after RCTV’s closure

first_img News August 25, 2020 Find out more May 28, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 International community urged to rally to defence of Venezuela’s media after RCTV’s closure to go further VenezuelaAmericas Reporters Without Borders reiterates its condemnation of the forcible closure of Venezuela’s most popular TV station, Radio Caracas Television (RCTV), which finally went off the air last night. Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives January 13, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Venezuela June 15, 2020 Find out more News Two journalists murdered just days apart in Venezuela New wave of censorship targeting critical media outlets Receive email alerts Organisation VenezuelaAmericas News News Reporters Without Borders today called for international condemnation of President Hugo Chávez’s decision not to renew the licence of Venezuela’s oldest TV station, Radio Caracas Television (RCTV), which was finally forced to stop broadcasting at midnight last night.“The closure of RCTV, which was founded in 1953, is a serious violation of freedom of expression and a major setback to democracy and pluralism,” the press freedom organisation said. “President Chávez has silenced Venezuela’s most popular TV station and the only national station to criticise him, and he has violated all legal norms by seizing RCTV’s broadcast equipment for the new public TV station that is replacing it.”Reporters Without Borders continued: “The grounds given for not renewing RCTV’s licence, including its support, along with other media, for the April 2002 coup attempt, are just pretexts. Other privately-owned TV stations that supported the coup attempt have not suffered the same fate because they subsequently adopted a subservient attitude towards the regime.”Directly or indirectly, President Chávez now controls almost all the broadcast media. RCTV’s closures is not, as he would have people believe, a mere administrative measure. It is a political move designed to reinforce his hegemony over the news media.This attack on media pluralism is just the latest in a long series of press freedom violations in Venezuela that have included attacks on hundreds of journalists in recent years, a “media social responsibility” law that restricts their programming, criminal code amendments increasing the penalties for press offences, publication of a list of journalists who allegedly “sold out to US interests,” and verbal threats by Chávez against foreign journalists.“We appeal to the international community to actively condemn this use of force and to defend what remains of the independent media in Venezuela,” Reporters Without Borders added.The threat to RCTV surfaced just eight days after Chávez’s reelection as president, when communication and information minister William Lara announced on 11 December 2006 that the renewal of its licence would be put to a referendum. President Chávez’s decision to terminate its licence without bothering with a referendum was announced 17 days later.The Venezuelan supreme court put an end to all further discussion when it ruled on 18 May that the appeal presented by RCTV on 9 February was “inadmissible.” RSF_en last_img read more

Journalist ordered to be deported

first_imgNews Andrew Meldrum, local correspondent for the British newspaper The Guardian for the past 22 years, was taken by police to Harare airport today to beexpelled from the country. Reporters Without Borders protested against themove as “disgraceful and unacceptable.” November 27, 2020 Find out more The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa ZimbabweAfrica November 12, 2020 Find out more Zimbabwean court must free imprisoned journalist who is unwell Meldrum has been persistently harassed. He was arrested on 30 April with two journalists from the independent newspaper The Daily News. They were accused of publishing “falsehoods” and jailed for two days, before being freed provisionally. The High Court acquitted Meldrum on 15 July. Receive email alerts ZimbabweAfrica Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Zimbabwecenter_img Organisation to go further Zimbabwean journalist Hopewell Chin’ono denied bail News September 1, 2020 Find out more 19/05/03Meldrum was deported to Britain on 16 May when immigration officials forcedhim onto a late-night Air Zimbabwe flight to London. His lawyer, BeatriceMtetwa, had obtained a High Court order forbidding his immediate expulsion,but the officials brushed it aside and took him to the plane._______________________________________________________________16/05/03Reporters Without Borders condemned as “disgraceful” today’s attempt by the Zimbabwean government to expel American journalist Andrew Meldrum, correspondent for the British daily The Guardian. “For the past two years, the Zimbabwean government has tried to get rid of all foreign journalists working in the country,” said the organisation’s secretary-general Robert Ménard. “The bid to deport Meldrum is the latest disgraceful and unacceptable episode.”Meldrum, a permanent resident of the country who has been The Guardian’s correspondent there for the past 22 years, went to the immigration office in Harare this morning in response to a summons. He was told he was being deported and a police car took him to the airport to be put on a plane. His lawyer, Beatrice Mtetwa, said shortly afterwards she had obtained a court order blocking the deportation.”Zimbabwe is one of the most backward countries in Africa as far as press freedom is concerned and certainly the harshest towards the independent media,” Ménard said. “President Robert Mugabe and his information minister, Jonathan Moyo, do not tolerate criticism of them in the foreign press.”Mugabe is on the Reporters Without Borders worldwide list of 42 predators of press freedom.Immigration officials went to Meldrum’s house in Harare at night on 7 May but he was not at home. They refused to say what they wanted with him. His lawyer said that as soon as legal procedures were respected, he would be at the disposition of the legal authorities. On 13 May, an immigration official accused him of breaking the rules of his residency by writing about the political situation. Reports RSF_en May 19, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist ordered to be deported Newslast_img read more

Concern that detained Tibetan magazine editor is being tortured

first_imgChinese police arrested Dokru Tsuilrim in his room in Ngaba Gomang monastery (in Sichuan province) at the start of April for publishing articles that allegedly support the “separatist forces.” The authorities have suspended publication of his magazine. Help by sharing this information The authorities have meanwhile stepped up controls in Machu county in Gansu province. According to a researcher at India’s Norbu Lingka Institute, Chinese officials threatened reprisals against residents who continue to listen to international radio stations or visit websites such as the Radio Free Asia one. The authorities have installed dozens of satellite dishes while confiscating those belonging to private individuals. Organisation to go further Receive email alerts China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures News News June 2, 2021 Find out more March 12, 2021 Find out more The press freedom organisation hails the release of Golok Jigme, a monk who helped filmmaker Dhondup Wangchen make the 2008 documentary “Leaving fear behind”. Dhondup Wangchen is still being held. China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison Follow the news on China Reporters Without Borders is concerned about the physical safety of journalists and website editors who have been arrested in the past few months in Tibet and neighbouring Tibetan regions. The latest to be arrested is Dokru Tsuilrim, a monk who edited the magazine Khawai Tsesok (Soul of the Snow). April 27, 2021 Find out more Tibetan human rights groups have reported new cases of Tibetans being arrested for sending “state secrets” abroad. One is a monk identified as Thuksam, based in Nurma monastery, who has been held since 11 March. The Public Security Bureau accuses him of sending reports about human rights violations to organisations abroad. It is not known where he is being held. ChinaAsia – Pacific Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes News ChinaAsia – Pacific RSF_en April 24, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Concern that detained Tibetan magazine editor is being tortured News “We are very worried by the reports of Chinese police torturing detained Tibetans, including a lama defended by lawyer Li Fangping,” Reporters Without Borders said. “They increase our concern that the six journalists detained in Tibet are being mistreated. All those held because of the views they expressed must be released without delay.”last_img read more

One year on, as new deadline looms in Congress, RSF reiterates its call for net neutrality’s safeguard

first_img News June 3, 2021 Find out more Editor’s note: A previous version of this press release inaccurately stated that “newly-elected Democrats in the US House of Representatives are fighting” to overturn the FCC’s ruling on net neutrality. This article has been updated to say the “US House of Representatives faces a key deadline this Friday to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) repeal of net neutrality rules.” The move could further harm people in underserved communities, especially in rural areas where there is already very little or no choice in carriers. These areas may be hit hardest by pay prioritization, whereby broadband providers allow companies to pay for priority treatment. RSF is also concerned about the impact the measures could have on the plurality of online content and competition. Help by sharing this information News RSF is planning to look into just how the dismantling of protective regulations could harm media diversity in the US since the repeal took effect just six months ago. On our radar: how the lack of regulation could benefit larger outlets thereby increasing media concentration to the detriment of competition from smaller entities. As the US House of Representatives faces a key deadline this Friday to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) repeal of net neutrality rules, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) reiterates its call for a neutral, accessible and equitable net. Receive email alerts When it comes to the information and communication space, RSF strongly believes in the virtues of political, ideological and religious neutrality as presented in its new Declaration on Information and Democracy. The net neutrality discourse has so far focused principally on commercial interests, to the detriment of the people and the core values of liberty, equality, diversity and self-determination. News December 20, 2018 One year on, as new deadline looms in Congress, RSF reiterates its call for net neutrality’s safeguard It’s been a year since the FCC voted to repeal net neutrality protection rules, and only six months since they took effect. The FCC reclassified broadband providers as an “information service” rather than a “telecommunications service” which is subject to nondiscrimination requirements. And this month, the FCC voted to apply the same classification for text messages. The controversial measure gives cellular carriers more power over SMS messages and means they will now have a legal right to censor text messages. SAUL LOEB / AFP Organisation RSF_en WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalistscenter_img United StatesAmericas Online freedomsMedia independence Internet The FCC’s removal of safeguards for a free and open net could also have damaging repercussions on the world stage given America’s online dominance. This could have a significant impact on the next generation of online services, which are already being fragilized across the world, especially with authoritarian governments and the rise of “digital authoritarianism.”    NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Under the previous protective provisions, Internet service providers were required to treat all data on the internet equally. Carriers were prohibited from blocking access or slowing down services or application on the web. The regulations also banned them from raising fees for faster access and allowed for a level playing field. Without these safeguards that protected consumers, much is at stake. April 28, 2021 Find out more “These deregulatory decisions are bad news for democracy. They make the internet, and now text messages, vulnerable to interference and censorship from internet service providers,” says RSF San Francisco director Sabine Dolan. “Carriers can now decide to block sites and prioritize content as well as the speed of content delivery. In our digital world, the internet is a forum of free speech. Net neutrality is vital to protect freedom of expression and media diversity.” Follow the news on United States to go further Meanwhile, recent revelations indicate that millions of comments posted on the FCC in support of deregulation were in fact fake. And while the FBI investigates the potential involvement of Russia in these postings, it turns out that, of the verified identity comments, the overwhelming majority of Americans favored an open and free web. To this day, 26 states cutting across political lines have passed their own net neutrality safeguards.  Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says Much is at stake June 7, 2021 Find out more Net neutrality vs. cyber manipulation United StatesAmericas Online freedomsMedia independence Internet Newslast_img read more

French court rejects Azerbaijani government’s defamation suit

first_img FranceAzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia Activities in the fieldCondemning abuses Judicial harassment June 7, 2021 Find out more RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says FranceAzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia Activities in the fieldCondemning abuses Judicial harassment “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says Reporters Without Borders (RSF) welcomes today’s decision by a court in the Parisian suburb of Nanterre to reject the Azerbaijani government’s defamation suit against French investigative journalists Elise Lucet and Laurent Richard.“We are deeply relieved that Azerbaijan has failed to export its censorship to France,” said Johann Bihr, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “Any other decision would have opened a dangerous breach that would have allowed despots all over the world to come and persecute French journalists in France.”The Azerbaijani government sued Lucet and Richard for referring to it as a “dictatorship” in radio and TV broadcasts in 2015. As far as RSF knows, it was the first time a foreign government brought a defamation suit of this kind against journalists before a French court.Reporters Without Borders testified in court on 5 September, defending the two journalists and describing how their fellow journalists are persecuted in Azerbaijan, which is ranked 162nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index.Read RSF’s detailed press release about the case (4 September 2017) Help by sharing this information News Organisation to go further Receive email alerts Stephane de Sakutin / AFP RSF_en November 7, 2017 French court rejects Azerbaijani government’s defamation suit News June 8, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia News June 4, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more