Justin Welby officially becomes archbishop of Canterbury

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Mervyn E. Singh says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments (2) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Tonye Willie-Pepple says: Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Anglican Communion News Service] The former bishop of Durham, the Rt. Rev. Justin Welby, has officially become the archbishop of Canterbury at a ceremony, known as the “Confirmation of Election,” which took place in the context of an act of worship on Feb. 4 at St. Paul’s Cathedral.The ceremony forms part of the legal process by which the appointment of the new archbishop of Canterbury is put into effect. It was presided over by Archbishop of York John Sentamu with the assistance of the bishops of London, Winchester, Salisbury, Worcester, Rochester, Lincoln, Leicester and Norwich. All were commissioned for this purpose by Her Majesty The Queen – who is the supreme governor of the Church of England.Welby’s name was put forward to The Queen some months ago by the church’s “Crown Nominations Commission” in accordance with constitutional arrangements that have been in place for many years. The appointment is formalized by legal steps taken in accordance with the Appointment of Bishops Act 1533. First, his election was undertaken in January by the dean and canons of Canterbury Cathedral. Next, their election of him has to be confirmed by the wider church, which is what happened today.The appointment is significant not only for the Diocese of Canterbury (where Welby will be the diocesan bishop, though much of the day-to-day oversight of the diocese is carried out on his behalf by the bishop of Dover), but also for the wider Province of Canterbury – the 29 dioceses in the South of England, and the Diocese of Europe, which all fall under his general oversight.In addition, it is to the bishop of the See of Canterbury, with which Anglicans have historically been in communion, that Anglicans worldwide give a primacy of honor and respect among the college of bishops in the Anglican Communion – as ‘first among equals’ (primus inter pares). In that role, as a focus and means of unity within the communion, the archbishop convenes and works with the Lambeth Conference and Primates’ Meeting, and presides in the Anglican Consultative Council, the communion’s main policy-making body.Since at least the fourth century it has been a fundamental principle in the Christian Church that the election of a new bishop must be confirmed by the wider church, especially by the bishops of the region. The legal significance of the act of confirmation cannot be overstated: it confers upon the new archbishop “the care, government and administration of the spirituals’ of the archbishopric. It is the confirmation of his election which makes the archbishop-elect into the bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury and archbishop of the province.The wording used in the course of the confirmation ceremony has a long history. Before the 18th century it was in Latin, but in about 1733 an English translation was introduced. At the service today, a somewhat modernized version was used. It involved recital of the Mandate from the Queen, authorizing the appointment; introduction of the new archbishop; certification of the steps taken in his election by the dean and canons of Canterbury; his Declaration of Assent to the historic doctrines and worship of the Church of England; a ‘charge’ by the archbishop of York, based on the needs of the diocese and province perceived by those involved in his appointment; and finally a ‘sentence’ conferring on him spiritual jurisdiction over the diocese and province.Enthronement on March 21After this step has been taken, there remain other formal stages before he begins his public ministry in Church and State, in particular his act of ‘Homage’ to The Queen. The public inauguration of his ministry – ‘the Enthronement’ – will take place at Canterbury Cathedral on March 21, and will be broadcast live on the BBC.Meanwhile, the new archbishop will be familiarizing himself with the tasks he will be called upon to perform over the coming years, meeting those he will be working with most closely, and preparing himself generally for all that lies ahead. He invites your prayers, for himself, his family, the church and the nation, during this period of preparation – and beyond. By ACNS staffPosted Feb 4, 2013 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 February 5, 2013 at 8:38 am We want to assure Archbishop Justin Welby of our prayers for him, his family and for his ministry the Worldwide Anglican Church. God has already richly blessed you. From the Parish of Woodlands, Montclair with Yellowwood Park, St. Etheldreda and St. Stephens, Durban, South Africa. Archbishop of Canterbury Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Justin Welby officially becomes archbishop of Canterbury Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY February 5, 2013 at 3:48 am I am happy for Archbishop Welby, as the Most.Rev Sentamu has rightly said, we live in an age of selfishness, where everything is right and wrong only if it concerns us, and he is going to be a Bishop to the Anglican Communion in such h a time as this, so it calls for serious work,prayers,bible study and listening for the voice of God as he begins his Arch-episcopacy, my prayer is for God to bless his ministry and make it a ministry of love, healing and one that will propagate the true and undiluted word of God.congrats Justin Cantuar and Mrs. Welby. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

Ferguson: ‘The ‘come to Jesus’ moment for us in the…

first_img October 20, 2014 at 5:25 pm I admire what many are doing in all the responses to Michael Brown’s tragic death some two months ago. I have not been involved, except that early on, I went and stood at the place on the street in Ferguson where he was shot and chatted with some of the nice folks gathered close by, then went on north to St. Stephen’s, Ferguson, where I have supplied several times over the years. (My last church where I was for 24 years prior to retirement was just about 10 minutes away in the City of Northwoods, also in St. Louis County. There we had a good mix of about half and half white and black members–though it was all white when I first got there in 1972. We knew and loved one another and leadership was shared by all. During much of my time there I took part in many marches in north St. Louis (city) with a group called Families Advocating Safe Streets, of which I was a board member. There were several mothers (African-American, as were virtually all in the group) among this group whose sons were murdered. There was a lot of crime and killing going on in that part of the city then, one year 269 murders in the City and County of St. Louis. We were protesting this and urging non-violence, in the 70’s and 80’s. Each New Year’s Eve we’d sponsor a memorial service in an area church there when, in just candlelight, all the names of those murdered in the city and county were slowly read aloud. These were very moving worship experiences. They are still being held. The Mayor of St. Louis and Police Chief of St. Louis County usually were among many speakers. In all, I think there was a good relationship between civil authorities and this group, lead by Jeanette Culpepper, a member of a Protestant Church of which her father was the Minister, in north St. Louis (city). I recall in one march on those (inner) city streets, I carried for a distance the 4-year old son of Jennifer Joyce, City Circuit Attorney. I believe she still holds that position.Of course the death of Michael Brown is tragic, and I feel for his parents and close friends. But we do not yet have all the facts about what really went on between him and the Ferguson police officer who shot him and– according to some authoritative reports–struggled with him in his police cruiser over the officer’s pistol, with it perhaps being a close life-or-death call for each of them at that point. I believe that we should await the full disclosure from the grand jury and maybe trial of the officer (Daren Wilson) before we jump to conclusions about this most sad episode. It was inexcusable that Brown’s body lay in the street for over four hours after his killing, and there is much injustice in the system in which often blacks are targeted in stops by police in the entire greater metropolitan area (and around the country). We all share the guilt for the systemic injustice and even police brutality in some cases. But I take issue with some of my friends’ and colleagues’ statements and actions in this whole affair.In the other case of a police shooting, in south St. Louis, it has become evident that the young man had a gun, was on parole for a gun incident weeks earlier, and actually fired at the officer I think two or three time before being shot and killed. However, even here we need to await the final report of all the facts given to the public before we make statements or take actions, especially those which condemn either side in the tragedy.God help us! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Comments (8) The Rev. Dr. Charles H. Morris says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Brad Howard says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK November 3, 2014 at 11:04 pm It’s not that the church is being used by a political movement. The church IS a political movement. That’s why it is collapsing from inside. Instead of focusing on teaching the word of God, it promotes social issues. Submit a Job Listing October 23, 2014 at 3:21 pm I am very encouraged to see that the LAY folk get it. There are some very well written and well thought responses to this article. Basically the LAY folks are saying, let’s not let the church politicise this issue which the Episcopalian Church has done in this case. The church leadership needs to LISTEN to their LAY constituents on issues like this and the other 500 lb elephant, gay marriage. A vast majority of the LAY constituents don’t agree in lockstep with our leadership. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Danielle Dowd, youth missioner for the Episcopal Diocese of Missouri, has been spending several days a week on the streets of Ferguson and St. Louis.[Episcopal News Service] Danielle Dowd was back in front of the Ferguson police department Oct. 15, just two days after being arrested there while protesting the fatal police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown and other African-American youths.Since Brown’s Aug. 9 death, “I’ve come a couple of days every week, except for when my 7-year-old daughter had her tonsils out and I needed to do the mom thing. I’ve been able to form some good relationships with young people, whose voices need to be heard,” Dowd, 26, youth missioner for the Episcopal Diocese of Missouri, told the Episcopal News Service (ENS).Similarly, the Rev. Jon Stratton, director of Episcopal Service Corps in the diocese, spent Oct. 13 – his 30th birthday – marching, singing, chanting “Whose streets? Our streets. Whose streets? God’s streets,” and ultimately, being arrested.They and other Episcopalians were among dozens jailed during a “Moral Monday” action at the Ferguson police department. It was part of a weekend series of acts of civil disobedience across the St. Louis region coordinated by “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and the Organization for Black Struggle.The emerging movement, its youthful leadership and developing relationships have been compared to 1960s civil rights activism by some and called a human rights movement by others. It has also brought into the open long-festering tensions between the African-American community and the police department, and spawned calls for sweeping educational, economic and institutional change.The moment presents interesting opportunities for the church, says the Very Rev. Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis. “This is the ‘come to Jesus’ moment for us in the church.”Chuck Wynder, missioner for social justice and advocacy for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, agreed. “We recognize that the church increasingly has a role to play in being a prophetic voice in a safe place for the work of racial justice and reconciliation. We continue to be a resource for the Diocese of Missouri and to bridge the events and the developments in Ferguson with the issues, the dynamics and the conversation around the country.”Among other things, “we are in the process of building a resource page, through [the wider church’s] Episcopal Public Policy Network, of voices, resources and practices about the death of Michael Brown, the situation in Ferguson and how that relates to the work of social justice and racial reconciliation through the church around the country,” Wynder said.The church continues to position itself to be an instrumental resource as Ferguson – and the rest of the nation – anxiously awaits the grand jury decision and if charges will stem from the Michael Brown shooting, said Wynder, who added: “We are ramping up for what we know is coming.”The Episcopal Church has been focusing resources on the Ferguson area since shortly after Brown’s death. In September it awarded $30,000 and Episcopal Relief & Development contributed another $10,000 for a grant to three area churches for domestic poverty, pastoral and community work in Ferguson.St. Stephen’s (Ferguson), Ascension (Northwoods), and All Saints’ (St. Louis City) have been significantly impacted by the upheaval in the aftermath of the fatal shooting of Brown and the community’s response to it. The churches have been at the forefront of mobilizing resources for the community, ministering to the needs of protestors and police alike and simply “being the church” for all.The march: Repentance, confession, absolution, arrestStratton was among an estimated several thousand people who joined the Oct. 13 largely youth-led march, braving so much rain that, at one point, “We were singing ‘Wade in the Water,’” he told ENS on Oct. 15.“The theme was of repentance and confession and absolution and turning from systems that perpetuate racism and injustice,” including church systems, he said. Clergy confessed their complicity in such systems and called upon police officers, standing in a line outside the Ferguson police station, to do likewise.“We want to be very clear that the clergy, speaking for myself and those by me, were not talking about individual sin, this is systematic sin,” he added. “We were telling the police officers they were very valued and beloved children of God, but they’re part of a system that not only stereotypes and dehumanizes folks on the other side, but also that leads to the dehumanization of the police force.“Every time they come out in riot gear, it is a tangible sign of dehumanization. They cease to be seen as people and more as machines or as weapons of violence.”The occasion marked the second time in her life that the Rev. Anne Kelsey, 67, retired rector of Trinity Church in St. Louis’s Central West End, was arrested. She recalled demonstrating at the Pentagon with the Episcopal Peace Fellowship and Witness for Peace 42 years ago “and this was not like that,” she told ENS. Then, “we were in the concourse of the Pentagon having a Mass for peace.”From left, the Rev. Anne Kelsey, the Rev. Jeff Moore, and the Rev. Jonathon Stratton, director of the Deaconess Anne House in St. Louis, were arrested together on Oct. 13.For Kelsey, the weekend, especially a Saturday evening rally, felt historic, like “we were seeing the rebirth of the civil rights movement.”So she attended the “Moral Monday” action in a cassock and surplice and stole “and we got there and it rained and rained, and halfway through, there was a tornado warning.”Kelsey joined the protests after the Oct. 8 fatal police shooting of another young African-American man, Vonderrit Myers, near her Shaw neighborhood home.“I heard the shots and my husband and I walked the three blocks to see what was going on. It was just terrible, the rage and grief and crowds,” she recalled. The circumstances surrounding the fatal shooting of Myers – who allegedly had a weapon and fired at police – differ from accounts of the death of Michael Brown, who was unarmed. But, “it was really traumatizing after the Michael Brown thing.”After police removed the body and crime scene tape, “we stood right on the spot where he died and prayed,” Kelsey said slowly, haltingly, painfully. “I just got involved in ways that I hadn’t planned on. This was my neighborhood,” she said. “There is a divide in this neighborhood. I stood there while this woman yelled at me for a long time. She said she had worked for Amnesty International and was berating the white clergy for not doing enough. It’s not a comfortable situation.”While demonstrating Oct. 13, Kelsey and others stood in front of the police line at the Ferguson Police Department and asked officers “to repent of the institutional sins of the police department. I told the man I was facing that, whether or not I like it, when I wear my collar, I’m the face of the church for people and I have to be the first one to ask forgiveness for the sins of the church whether I’ve committed them or not in the same way. Police officers wear the face of the justice system. I don’t think it’s unreasonable to ask them to reflect on that.”When she knelt in front of him she “fell through the line” and was arrested and immediately handcuffed and placed in a police vehicle. She was jailed for several hours and then released.An emerging movement: ‘The young people are mentoring us’Dowd and Stratton have both spent several days a week on the streets of Ferguson and St. Louis “getting to know the young folks who’ve been out there every day for 67 days. Part of what I want to do is to support them and follow them,” Stratton said.“They’re the ones most affected by the police brutality, who were friends of Michael Brown and live in Ferguson. They are the folks the church needs to be listening to and in many ways, taking our cue from.”Like Joshua Williams, 18, and Jermell Hasson, 27, who on Oct. 15 were outside the Ferguson police department along with Dowd.“I’ve been out here every day because Michael Brown was my first cousin,” said Williams. “What brought me out here was, I saw him on the ground. I saw his blood on the ground. I put myself in his position. That could have been me on the ground, could have been anybody else’s child on the ground, So, I’m fighting for the rights of children.“That made me come out here, for everybody in the world and their kids.”Hasson agreed that the issue means fuller, deeper justice for Michael Brown, “but that is just one aspect of what’s at stake. ““This has a lot to do with human rights,” he added. “This isn’t a civil rights movement, it’s a human rights movement. I should be able to get the same treatment as anyone else who steps into a police station across the United States and I will be here till forever.”But for now, “I’m focusing on Michael Brown. I want a killer to go jail,” added Hasson, who was arrested at the protest and said he had just been released from jail Oct. 15 following a previous protest arrest. “If I had to find a word for Ferguson,” he said, “it’s ‘fragile.’ It can go either way. It’s just very, very hard.”Unaffiliated with a church, Hasson said maintaining a presence outside the police department has given him hope because of “the diversity I see out here. It shows me that it’s not just African-American women and men that stand for me. I see a lot of white women and brothers, and Asians. I like the diversity, that everyone can relate to what we go through in this society. I’ve learned about other cultures out here in side conversations. This is a learning experience.”‘This is what theology looks like’Kinman says that “one of the most insidious pieces of living in a segregated society is that we don’t have relationships where we know each other ” and so are tempted not to see each other in images of God and are tempted into fear and, particularly when we’re tired and in trauma, we’re tempted to act out of those places,” which affords the church really interesting roles that may seem contradictory.One role is to be “where the Gospel is emerging, from these young leaders on the street. We need to be present with these young leaders on the street, amazing nonviolent young leaders,” Kinman said.Another is to build relationships with police officers, also victims of an institutional system, Dowd said Oct.15. “I am not out here to demonize police officers or law enforcement. I want us all to work together to find something better,” she said.“The system doesn’t benefit police officers, either. It strips them of their humanity and it doesn’t benefit young African-Americans. Many times, it strips them of their lives.”Dowd said she is learning more about privilege and “the misconceptions I’ve had or ways I’ve benefitted from being white in this country. I’m learning to do a lot of listening and realizing I don’t have to always be the one in charge. It’s important to listen and learn from and follow the lead of young black people on the ground here, day in and day out, living it all the time.“For me, this is a choice; for them, it’s not,” she added. “I can step into this and step away any time I want. But this is their everyday life. This is something that these young people feel is a matter of life and death for them. I am proud and honored and humbled to be able to stand in solidarity to show them I mean it when I say I’m with them all the way.”Kinman said that on Oct. 13 demonstrators revised a traditional protest call-and-response chant from “show me what democracy looks like, this is what democracy looks like’ to “show me what theology looks like, this is what theology looks like” and added that many protestors have called upon the church to get more fully involved.But he added: “this isn’t your grandmother’s civil rights movement. These young people met on Twitter and are using technology for social change. And, they’re not Episcopalian. One of the major teachable moments for us is, these are people who have not been in our churches. Some go to church but in general the voices coming out are voices that feel like the church has left them behind. They want to know where we’ve been.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Charles Jett says: Catherine Cummings says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY October 20, 2014 at 9:47 pm Thank you Dr. Morris for a sane and reasonable response to a tragic situation. Statement like “murder”, “execution” and “justice for the killer” only incite others to join the chorus without knowing the facts. I challenge any of those protesting to fill the shoes of the policeman for a week as he/she patrol alone in a an area where crime might have occurred and face a belligerent or uncooperative person and see how they might react. Why can’t people wait for the dust to settle on all the facts be learned. We have waited a year or more for the federal government to “investigate” various incidents and still have no results. I do not see the same outrage from those protesting in Ferguson. The Church needs to be present, but as a calming and positive influence, not as a political advocate for just one side. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET October 20, 2014 at 7:02 pm I am very concerned that the church is being used by a political movement being played out in the media. I believe instead we should be more soberly reflective and less emotionally reactive. We don’t know what the facts of this particular case are. And I am unable to discern what, precisely, local clergy are advocating when they participate in public protests baiting the police. It is indeed a “come to Jesus moment for us in the church.” Frankly, this is embarrassing. October 22, 2014 at 9:29 pm I agree that we need to wait for the full report of what actually happened. There are too many rumors and unsubstantiated stories out there. There has been a woeful lack of leadership. I think St. Louis badly needs Uni-Gov that is amalgamation. We don’t need 91 tiny police departments and fire departments, we need one well staffed, fully trained, fully budgeted fire and police and fire department. Indianapolis IN and Louisville KY have done this as have other city/counties in the USA with great success. Isn’t there some other way of dealing with problems other than shooting people? I didn’t even know it was illegal to walk in the street (foolish perhaps as you might be hit by a car) but illegal?? and calls for shooting the person?? May be angry words and name-calling took place? We just don’t know. I recall a few years back that a “sting” operation was set-up at the Jack-in-a-Box at Handley Road and I-70. A car driven by an African American with an African American passenger pull into the parking lot. And the police fired 21 bullets into the car killing both men (there were no warrants out for them). The police claimed at first that the men tried to run them down. But checking the film in the Jack-in-a-Box security cameras showed that no such thing had happened!! The police were not charged with anything because it was felt just by being there they were in fear of their lives. Prosecutor McCullough did not help matters by commenting “O, They were just a couple of bums!”. Later questions were raised as to why that spot was chosen for a “sting” as many commenters went to the Jack-in-a-Box to get a coffee or something on their way to work. Obviously the whole operation was badly thought-out and planned. The incident in the Shaw neighborhood involved a young man who had previously been arrested after a police car chase and charged with firing a gun which was subsequently found to have been stolen. Persons charged with such crimes are supposed to be jailed and held on a $30,000 cash-only bond. For some unknown reason this bond was waived in this case. Again a poorly thought-out situation. Earlier a young man who may have been mentally deranged was shot dead in the street, the several police officers made no attempt to Mace or taser him first. Film footage showed the man with his hands at his side and he was not in a threatening pose as the police claimed. We need a better trained police force, more responsive and just law enforcement and better ways of dealing with the homeless and mentally ill. Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events October 21, 2014 at 3:18 pm They don’t want justice. They want social justice, meaning convict a racist cop (who happens to be innocent). Race apparently trumps truth.See “Ann Coulter Takes on the Racial Grievance Industry” at http://t.co/YgG2rpgZIc. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR October 21, 2014 at 9:25 am Protests like these have typically been organized by “rent a mob” groups who want to agitate; to promote anarchy. New facts are emerging that certainly challenge the mantra of Michael Brown’s innocence. The police baiting, impetuous assumptions, and shouting protesters have become tiresome. Like most social justice causes these days there is the false premise that the aggrieved are the arbiters of the truth and that we as a Church must respond if not agree. The Baptismal Covenant has been misused for this (and other social issues) in that it is assumed that if someone feels wronged that we must agree with them to respect their dignity. Brad is right. Why are clergy vesting to howl with crowds when so much is either hyped and yet to be proven? Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Racial Justice & Reconciliation Ferguson, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Bella Oxmyx says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Ferguson: ‘The ‘come to Jesus’ moment for us in the church’ Episcopal clergy, others arrested as protests continue An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Doug Desper says: Peter Castle says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA By Pat McCaughanPosted Oct 20, 2014 Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Greg Hammel says: last_img read more

La Jungla: la mayor villamiseria de Francia

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Migrantes miran el incendio de los improvisados albergues y tiendas de “La Jungla” el tercer día de su evacuación y transferencia a centros de acogida en todo el país, como parte del desmantelamiento del campamento de Calais, Francia. 26 de octubre. Foto de Philippe Wojazer REUTERS.[Episcopal News Service] En diciembre pasado, acompañé a la deana de la catedral episcopal de la Santa Trinidad, en París, la Muy Rda. Lucinda Laird, y a un grupo de voluntarios de la catedral a visitar al campamentos de migrantes en Calais, conocido como “La Jungla”, o la mayor villamiseria de Francia.En francés, villamiseria se llama “bidonville” deriva de los bidones de gasolina que alguna vez solían llevarse en la parte trasera de los jeeps de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Una vez que los desechaban, [había gente que] los cortaban y con ellos fabricaban viviendas, junto con tablas, telas, planchas de plástico para los techos y cosas por el estilo. Hay muchos términos para describir esto. Una aglomeración de estos bidones se convierte en la “villa”, En otras palabras, un bidonville es un zona de tugurios fundada en las orillas de las ciudades. Hay muchos términos para llamar a estos pueblos hechos de desechos: favelas en Brasil, colonias populares en México, villamiserias en Argentina, poblaciones callampas en Chile, umjondolo (chabolas) en Sudáfrica, shammasas en Sudán, iskwaters en las Filipinas. Las villamiserias son ubicuas.Mientras caminaba a través del campamento de Calais ese día en medio de una lluvia torrencial, resbalando en el lodo gris, me acordaba de otros campamentos que había visitado y que habían sido enteramente creados por personas que se agrupaban. Los clásicos campamentos de refugiados que uno visita y que son construidos por gobiernos o por la ONU (tales como los que se preparan para recibir a las personas que huyen de Mosul) tienen un trazado lógico, como los campamentos militares de las legiones romanas. Las villamiserias, por el contrario, son orgánicas, por así decir. Se desarrollan a partir de la necesidad y se convierten en pequeñas ciudades, en pequeñas comunidades. Las ciudades de tiendas de Puerto Príncipe, en Haití, me vienen a la mente. Recuerdo haber visitado estas comunidades de tiendas después del terremoto de 2010. Estaban notablemente bien organizadas, confundiendo a los expertos en economía que había acudido a asesorar al gobierno.Una vista muestra los restos calcinados de improvisados albergues y tiendas en “La Jungla” al tercer día de la evacuación de migrantes y de su traslado a centros de acogida en distintos lugares de Francia, como parte del desmantelamiento del campamento de Calais, Francia, 26 de octubre. Foto de Pascal Rossignol/REUTERS.La jungla no era diferente, excepto que la población cambiaba continuamente. Tan mala como puede ser la vida en una villamiseria, esto era peor, porque tan pronto la gente se instalaba, tenía que irse. El caos que esto causaba se complicaba por los esfuerzos del Reino Unido de no darles entrada, porque toda esta gente estaba en Calais al objeto de cruzar el canal de La Mancha. En otras palabras, estaban en Francia ilegalmente, puesto que los solicitantes de asilo deben ir al país en el que buscan asilo. Una curiosidad es que el R.U. tiene, en alguna medida, soberanía sobre Calais, luego del Tratado de Touquet con Francia de 2002 adjunto a la utilización del túnel del Canal (también le da a Francia derechos en Dover, pero no hay problemas de migrantes allí). Vi kilómetros de costosas cercas de alta tecnología rematadas por relumbrantes alambres de púas, como una prisión, pagadas por el R.U.Y al igual que una prisión, La Jungla está rodeada por la policía nacional fuertemente armada, rudos agentes que regularmente se enfrentan con manifestantes en las calles de las ciudades francesas. Ellos intervienen regularmente en las peleas que surgen, o en lo incendios que accidental o deliberadamente se producen. Desde luego, estos improvisados habitáculos son muy inflamables, convirtiéndose fácilmente en una intensa llamarada.Ahora están desapareciendo, el gobierno francés ha decidido erradicar La Jungla para siempre. Mientras escribo esto, millares de personas están siendo trasladadas en autobuses por toda Francia. Van en pequeños grupos a los nuevos “centros de acogida y orientación”. El primer grupo de 10 se reportó que los habían dejado ayer en el pueblo de Chardonnay.Debido a mi experiencia como cofundador y presidente de la Asociación para ayudar a las Minorías del Oriente (Association d’entraide aux minorités d’Orient) [AEMO]— un ministerio de refugiados para personas amenazadas de muerte por razones de fe— soy muy consciente de lo que estos migrantes de Calais enfrentan ahora. En primer lugar, a uno se le concede “protección subsidiaria” durante dos años, lo cual incluye atención médica, un poco de dinero y un lugar para dormir, escuela para los niños y lecciones de francés. Luego uno tiene que presentar un caso para solicitar asilo político a la Oficina para la Protección de Refugiados y Apátridas (OFPRA). Te reúnes con un funcionario que escucha tu historia, usualmente a través de un intérprete, y luego algún tiempo después recibes la respuesta. Uno puede apelar una decisión negativa, y ocasionalmente se produce una revocación. La concesión de asilo significa comenzar una nueva vida, con un estipendio, un apartamento, atención médica, lecciones de francés, un permiso de trabajo y finalmente la nacionalidad francesa.Bomberos franceses trabajan cerca del incendio de albergues improvisados en “La Jungla” el tercer día de evacuación y traslado de migrantes a centros de recepción en Francia, como parte del desmantelamiento del campamento de Calais, Francia, 26 de octubre. Foto de Pascal Rossignol/REUTERS.Históricamente, Francia ha ocupado el primer o segundo lugar en el mundo entre las naciones que otorgan asilo. Algunas, como Arabia Saudita, no conceden ninguno. “La tierra del asilo” es una frase popular que describe a Francia, y muchos miles de personas se han beneficiado de ello durante décadas, hasta, en un momento, el escritor y activista político estadounidense Eldridge Cleaver. Pero los servicios de refugio se han extendido al máximo (AEMO ya no alberga a refugiados en los centros oficiales, los situamos con familias de acogida, que muy generosamente abren sus hogares a los refugiados por meses y meses). Con millares de ellos que quieren atravesar Francia para entrar en el R.U., el gobierno se ha visto atrapado en un dilema: ¿qué hacer con solicitantes ilegales de asilo que no pueden salir?El desmantelamiento de La Jungla se ha demorado mucho más del debido. Dejar entrar a menores en el R.U. a reunirse con sus familias ha tomado muchísimo más tiempo de lo que debía. Si bien la Iglesia de Inglaterra ha intentado cambiar la mentalidad de la gente —el arzobispo Justin Welby alberga a una familia de refugiados en el Palacio de Lambeth— la votación del Brexit ha hecho la acogida a los refugiados políticamente difícil. La política del temor en el R.U., combinada con la inercia del gobierno francés, ha resultado una calamidad hecha a medida para millares de personas que se quedaron en ese lodo frío y gris. ¿Qué será de ellos ahora que les ofrecen un lugar en un país que no quieren y que hasta ahora no les ha dado ninguna razón para quererlo? Los [británicos] que votaron por la “Salida” le dieron a los refugiados su respuesta: váyanse a cualquier parte menos aquí. Estos refugiados son las primeras bajas de la era de la “postverdad” en Gran Bretaña, donde hay vallas que mienten descaradamente anunciando la inminente llegada de 72 millones de turcos, aunque Turquía no está en la Unión Europea y ahora no tiene ninguna oportunidad de ingresar.Los héroes anónimos de la historia han sido los muchos abnegadísimos voluntarios y asociaciones que se empeñaron en mostrarles a los refugiados de La Jungla el rostro de la bondad, de la aceptación, de la acogida. Esto incluye a miembros de la catedral episcopal de París que han dado mucho movidos por la compasión. Enviamos camiones cargados de ropa, de calcetines, de mantas; hubo personas que apoyaron económicamente a las asociaciones locales con colectas. Reacondicionamos un autocaravana para convertirlo en una unidad de enfermería móvil. Los feligreses iban de visita y daban lo que podían. Muchos otros también se presentaron, trabajando incansablemente entre los residentes que cambiaban de continuo, enfrentándose a los elementos con ellos, construyendo albergues, proporcionándoles comidas y ropa y un oído receptivo. Es aleccionador el ser su obispo.Al tiempo que este capítulo de nuestros huéspedes concluye, y comienza otro nuevo e incierto, quiero decir que espero que los millares que subieron a los autobuses esta semana encuentren acogida en este país del tamaño de Texas. Espero que puedan encontrar alguna paz al final. AEMO ha reasentado 3.500 personas, trayéndoles de Irak a la seguridad de Francia, la mayoría cristianos, pero musulmanes también. Es un viaje difícil para cualquiera que lo haga con un visado, cuanto peor si no se tienen documentos.Pero me temo que la era de nuevas villamiserias pudiera estar empezando. ¿Cuándo terminará este masivo movimiento de gentes? Los pueblos envejecientes de Europa (con excepción de irlandeses y franceses) no pueden pagar las pensiones sin un nuevo influjo de obreros jóvenes. Los mil millones de africanos de hoy probablemente se convertirán en dos mil millones para 2050. Para no mencionar los millones de desesperados y coléricos en el Oriente Medio, en Paquistán y en la India y sí, en la China también. ¿Sabrá Occidente qué hacer? Y las iglesias de Occidente ¿tomarán la iniciativa o se esconderán? ¿Seremos las ovejas de la parábola de Jesús, que lo vieron entre los desgraciados y procuraron ayudarlo, o entre las cabras que rehusaron?— El Rvdmo. Pierre Whalon es el obispo a cargo de la Convocación de las Iglesias Episcopales en Europa. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY center_img Tags Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Refugees Migration & Resettlement Por Pierre WhalonPosted Oct 26, 2016 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Advocacy Peace & Justice, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK La Jungla: la mayor villamiseria de Francia Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA last_img read more

Instituto de Tierra Santa para sordos asiste a refugiados y…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Refugees Migration & Resettlement Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Instituto de Tierra Santa para sordos asiste a refugiados y prepara a niños discapacitados para una vida llena de sentido In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books El Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos ofrece una educación fundamentalmente individualizada a sus alumnos, que aprenden los rudimentos del lenguaje de signos mediante enseñanza táctil. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service] Durante más de 50 años,  el Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos ha trabajado para capacitar a niños sordos, sordo-ciegos, y con dificultades auditivas,  así como a niños con otras discapacidades sensoriales y físicas, para su inclusión y participación en sus familias, comunidades y sociedades de una manera significativa. Es la única escuela del Oriente Medio que ofrece educación  a personas con pérdida congénita de la audición, y en 2001 se convirtió en la primera escuela de la región en aceptar a niños sordo-ciegos.Unos 120 alumnos, con edades que oscilan entre los 3½ a los 21 años, el 90 por ciento de ellos internos, estudian en el recinto del Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos, en Salt, Jordania, a unos 50 minutos en auto de la capital, Ammán. Cuando llegan los nuevos estudiantes, suelen tener de tres a cinco años de retraso en el desarrollo del lenguaje. Cada estudiante aprende los fundamentos del lenguaje de signos mediante un aprendizaje basado en el juego, después de lo cual los sitúan en clases conforme a su edad y a su capacidad educacional.“No nos vemos como una escuela para niños sordos, somos una escuela de medios de lenguaje de signos”, dijo el director ejecutivo, el hermano A. L. de Carpentier, que vino al instituto en 1977. La escuela enseña lenguaje de signos en árabe, francés e inglés, dijo él, añadiendo que el árabe que se habla en Jordania contiene más de 20.000 signos.El hermano Andrew A. L. de Carpentier, director ejecutivo del Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos, dirige a los episcopales en un recorrido por la institución con sede en Salt, Jordania, en que les muestra una regla para el aprendizaje táctil y  un letrero fuera que marca un aula en lenguaje de signos. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Oriundo de los Países Bajos y criado en la tradición reformada holandesa, de Carpentier comenzó a trabajar con los sordos en El Líbano, donde también se hizo anglicano, en los años setenta.Trabajando a través de su red, el instituto ha ayudado a establecer 60 escuelas asociadas en Oriente Medio, en países como Siria, Irak, Yemen, Egipto y Palestina, y también en Afganistán y Pakistán, dijo él.“Lo usual era que alcanzaran una educación de sexto grado y una escuela vocacional, y hemos cambiado eso en Oriente Medio”, dijo de Carpentier. Ahora los estudiantes llegan a la Escuela Secundaria y 50 han ido a la universidad.“El ministerio allí es tan notable por que se ocupa de niños discapacitados y de sus familias”, dijo el Rdo. canónigo Robert Edmunds, el funcionario de asociaciones [globales] de la Iglesia para el Oriente Medio. “El impacto trasciende a cada niño en particular… cuando multiplicas eso por el número de familias implicadas y cómo esas familias extendidas están conscientes de este ministerio, la huella —del bien que la Iglesia cristiana está haciendo aquí, y la capacitación y la educación y la esperanza para el futuro que tienen estos niños— es incalculable”.En Jordania, como en todos los países del Oriente Medio, los musulmanes son mayoría y los cristianos constituyen una pequeña minoría, y el proselitismo está prohibido. El instituto acepta estudiantes, muchos de ellos de familias pobres, que provienen de todas partes del país.Una mujer trabaja en un mosaico para venderlo en la tienda de artesanías del Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.La escuela funciona con un presupuesto anual de $1 millón y recibe dinero del gobierno de Jordania y subvenciones, donaciones privadas y ayuda de los Amigos del Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos. Emplea a 34 maestros, 20 por ciento de ellos sordos y muchos de los cuales han sido educados en la escuela y son voluntarios. A lo largo de los años, las actitudes culturales hacia los discapacitados han cambiado, particularmente desde que las Naciones Unidas instituyeron el Año Internacional de las Personas Discapacitadas en 1981, dijo de Carpentier.Sin embargo, subsisten las dificultades. Con la larga duración de la guerra civil en Siria y la creciente violencia en Irak, las escuelas asociadas en esos países ya no funcionan, aunque el Instituto está proporcionándoles servicios a niños y sus familias en los campamentos de refugiados de Jordania, una de los primeros países de acogida para personas desplazadas por la violencia y la persecución.El Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos es parte de la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén, que incluye Israel, Palestina, Jordania, Siria y El Líbano. Un asociado de larga data de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, el Instituto ha estado colaborando con una red de organizaciones locales para establecer un centro satélite en el mayor de los campamentos de refugiados, Za’atari. Con crecientes necesidades y respondiendo a una invitación de las autoridades locales, está en el proceso de abrir un centro adicional en Al-Azraq, el segundo de los campos de refugiados. Este nuevo centro se propone servir aproximadamente a 1.500 personas con discapacidades.“Es particularmente esperanzador ver que el Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos y la Diócesis de Jerusalén no sólo siguen determinados en su apoyo a las familias y niños en el campamento de Za’atari, sino que también están reproduciendo este exitoso programa en el campamento de Azraq”, dijo Nagulan Nesiah, funcionario principal del programa para respuesta a desastres y reducción de riesgos de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo. “Luego de cinco años de crisis en Siria sin señales de atenuación, nuestros asociados locales en la región que estaban activos antes del conflicto aún siguen ayudando lo más que pueden y continuaremos apoyándolos”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Ella visitó el Instituto de Tierra Santa para Sordos, en Salt, Jordania, durante un viaje, en octubre pasado, para escritores y blogueros de temas religiosos auspiciado por la Junta de Turismo Jordana y Royal Jordanian Airlines. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Anglican Communion, Israel-Palestine, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Middle East, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Por Lynette Wilson Posted Dec 19, 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Anglican leaders echo Pope Francis’ call for day of prayer…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Posted Feb 8, 2018 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Anglican Communion News Service] Senior Anglican leaders have endorsed Pope Francis’ call for an ecumenical day of prayer and fasting for peace, with a particular focus on the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan. Pope Francis made his call on Feb. 4 in his traditional Angelus address to crowds in St Peter’s Square in the Vatican. It has now been endorsed by the acting primate of the Anglican Church of South Sudan, the secretary general of the Anglican Communion, and the deputy director of the Anglican Centre in Rome.Read the entire article here. Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Anglican leaders echo Pope Francis’ call for day of prayer and fasting for peace Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

Church leaders unite behind vision for ‘one people, one nation,…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Anglican Communion News Service] Church leaders in South Sudan, including  Anglican Primate and Archbishop Justin Badi Arama, have issued a joint statement calling on political leaders in the war-torn country to pursue peace. After a meeting in Nairobi, Kenya, the heads of churches in the membership of the South Sudan Council of Churches issued a joint statement lamenting the violence and suffering of the nation’s people. “We as the shepherds of the people of South Sudan continue to mourn and grieve for our country,” they say. “Our hearts pain for the suffering, tired, hungry flock and for our leaders with all their fears, anger and trauma as they struggle both across our nation, the region and the world.”Read the entire article here. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Africa, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Sudan & South Sudan Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Church leaders unite behind vision for ‘one people, one nation, and one South Sudan’ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Jul 24, 2018 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

Therapy dogs are soothing ambassadors for Massachusetts church’s pet ministry

first_imgTherapy dogs are soothing ambassadors for Massachusetts church’s pet ministry Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC By David PaulsenPosted Aug 22, 2018 August 22, 2018 at 7:13 pm What a wonderful story! My guide dog, Veronique, is also a therapy pet, certified through TherapyPets, and we volunteer at our local hospital and also do some nursing home visits. Wish we could do more after disasters and other events. Keep up the good work! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group August 22, 2018 at 7:55 pm What a marvelous mission. August 23, 2018 at 10:44 am This is an awesome ministry. Pets of all kinds around the world has given life to those who are unable to seek it themselves. Even us who are not in hospitals for other facilities but are in our senior years find our pets to be the most invaluable partners. They keep us busy with many different tasks to support their living. But we love them truly and they love us. They know a lot about the way of love. Jan Robitscher says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Nancy Bean says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Lore Cody says: Cynthia Bronson Sweigert says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Beverley Phillips says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR August 22, 2018 at 7:15 pm Great to read. My kelpie has accompanied every choir practice and Sunday liturgies in Nth Melbourne, ( Victoria, Australia) beside the organ for the past 14 years and assisted in many wedding and funeral music interviews. Whilst not a therapy dog, he is a much lived member of the congregation. Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA August 22, 2018 at 6:42 pm My heart is full! Bless you and this ministry. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Some of Perfect Paws Pet Ministry’s therapy dogs and their owners pose for a photo in Danvers, Massachusetts. Photo: Fran Weil[Episcopal News Service] Paxton may not understand the full significance of his calling, but the 10-year-old Westie is one of All Saints Episcopal Church’s most dedicated ministers serving as Jesus’ paws in the world.As a therapy dog dispatched by Perfect Paws Pet Ministry at All Saints in Danvers, Massachusetts, Paxton and his human, Fran Weil, have brought the soothing presence of a canine companion to students of all ages, nursing home residents, hospital patients and recovering addicts in drug rehabilitation centers. Weil is always amazed by the sense of calm that can be conveyed from simply patting her dog’s head.“As terrific as the response is to our dogs wherever we go, it’s so rewarding for us,” Weil said. “It is really God’s work, and we are so blessed to use one of God’s creatures to do this amazing outreach.”Weil, the therapy dog coordinator for the church, is one of several parishioners with dogs certified to do this work, along with the other 600 active members of Dog B.O.N.E.S. Therapy Dogs of Massachusetts. Some of these therapy dogs were called on to provide comfort to victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. Others regularly serve as captive listeners for elementary schoolers learning to read.In another case a while back, Perfect Paws dispatched one of its therapy dogs to provide “a little comfort time” for the family and friends of a 10-year-old who was hit and killed by a train, Weil said. It offered “a wonderful diversion” from the pain of loss.Episcopal churches across the country are engaged in pet ministries of one kind or another. One of the most common are the annual services offering pet blessings, typically held in early October around the Feast Day of St. Francis of Assisi, patron saint of animals.The Episcopal Church Asset Map, though not a comprehensive listing, shows at least a dozen congregations that take their pet outreach a step further, from pet supply collections to fundraisers benefiting the local no-kill animal shelter.All Saints appears to be the only Episcopal church so fully engaged with a therapy dog ministry, thanks largely to the work of Weil, 71. She describes herself as a longtime lapsed Catholic who began attending Episcopal services late in life and “had never experienced such welcome ever.” She has worshipped at All Saints since 2001.Her role with Perfect Paws is negotiable: founder, lead volunteer, honorary pet chaplain. Each title might be appropriate, she said. She also sometimes serves as a pet bereavement counselor, and she accompanies pet owners on trips to the veterinarian when tough decisions need to be made about life and death.Weil is a natural for that kind of work because her love of animals is nearly universal.“I love any animal. I’ve never met an animal I haven’t liked,” she said. “Well, I haven’t met a tarantula. I might be a little reluctant.”All Saints launched Perfect Paws Pet Ministry in May 2010 with a monthly evening Eucharist for pet owners and their pets, all pets – rabbits, birds, cats, but mostly dogs. A story about the service got picked up by the Associated Press and drew national and even international attention to the ministry, Weil said, but the outreach has remained local.“We started this because we realized that people find God in different ways, and so often it’s through their animals,” she said. “We often say it’s not an accident that ‘God’ spelled backward is ‘dog.’”The services draw about 30 to 50 people, some of whom have been attending since the beginning, even those whose pets have since died.The Rev. Marya DeCarlen, rector at All Saints, said only a handful of the pet service regulars are also All Saints parishioners. Perfect Paws, then, has become a distinct worship community centered around pet ownership.“It is a place for humans and their pets to share life transitions, so a lot of grief work happens in these services,” DeCarlen said. “And a lot of joy and appreciation is lifted up in these services,” such as new adoptions.“It parallels our own lives when we join a community. This community is really more than Eucharist. It is the body of Christ sharing life transitions with each other.”The Perfect Paws Pet Ministry at All Saints Episcopal Church in Danvers, Massachusetts, hosted a meeting of the West Highland White Terrier Club in September.DeCarlen began serving at All Saints a little over four years ago and initially found the pet services to be a bit overwhelming, but she quickly warmed to the ministry and asked parishioners to suggest ways of expanding it beyond the monthly services.All Saints now collects pet food to donate to the local food pantry, and members minister to police and military K-9 handlers who have lost their dogs. About five times a year, the church hosts therapy dog workshops in the parish hall led by Weil and another parishioner.Most dogs, regardless of breed, can serve as therapy dogs as long as they aren’t skittish, can handle unfamiliar environments and can be trained to follow basic commands and negotiate around objects, such as a wheelchair or walker. The bond between dog and owner is the most important factor, Weil said.“Nobody knows the dog better than the owner,” she said. “It’s always good to know that the person has a good relationship with the dog.”Any organization can contact Perfect Paws or Dog B.O.N.E.S. and request a free visit from a therapy dog. Most of Perfect Paws’ therapy dogs spend time in schools, whether easing high school students’ stress before and during exams or helping younger students learn to read.For the younger students, they are encouraged to read directly to the dog, an experience shown to have measurable benefits in improving reading skills.The Rev. Marya DeCarlen and her dog, Blue, meet with a group at the library in Danvers, Massachusetts.“They feel inhibited when reading in front of peers … but they don’t in front of the dog,” said DeCarlen, whose 13-year-old Labrador, Blue, is often on the receiving end of those children’s readings.“That has been a wonderful experience, to see children not only read but to use expressions. They want the dog to have a reaction when they read,” DeCarlen said. As for Blue, “he just loves to be doted upon.”Dogs are known for giving unconditional love, and Weil said that is one reason why reading to dogs is so beneficial. “The dog’s never going to say, ‘That’s the wrong word. You didn’t pronounce it right.’”It’s like a theatrical performance, she added, with the children suspending their disbelief and reading as if the dog is really understanding the story.The parishioners from All Saints who participate in the therapy dog ministry have become like a family, and they have supported each other in times of grief, particularly over the past year, during which four of the dogs died, Weil said.That grief mirrors what many pet owners feel at the loss of longtime companions who, too, felt like part of the family, and this has been another motivation for All Saints to step up its outreach and its message of welcome.Pets have “taken on a bigger importance in people’s lives, and when that happens you bring what’s important to you to church, whether it’s in your mind or heart or spirit,” DeCarlen said. To be a member of the body of Christ, she said, is to embrace a sense of purpose in those relationships while spreading compassion to others, whether they walk on two feet or four paws.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Comments (7) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Lary Youngsteadt says: Rector Washington, DC August 23, 2018 at 1:09 pm I am a proud member of All Saints Episcopal Church in Danvers. Fran Weil has an abundance of love and compassion which she shares freely with no motive other than to spread love regardless of species. We are blessed to have Fran her spouse Gail and their amazing Westies! God has given us such a wonderful gift; the capacity to love, love, love. We at All Saints freely share that gift. Thank you to Fran and Marya our Rector Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS August 22, 2018 at 10:34 pm My two Pet Therapy Dogs have been Volunteers for Hospice. We also visit assisted living homes, nursing homes and schools. We are involved in library program Tales for Tails where they go and children read to them.It is a very rewarding ministry for all. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

Hundreds of Episcopalians make ‘Pledge to Care for Creation’ in…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA The crescent Earth rises above the lunar horizon in this photo taken from the Apollo 17 spacecraft in lunar orbit during the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. Photo: NASA[Episcopal News Service] Caring for God’s creation may seem like a daunting task, the Earth being so vast and the threats to the natural world so pervasive, but The Episcopal Church is encouraging Episcopalians during Lent to pledge to take even the smallest of steps, because those steps together can make a difference.That is the idea behind the church’s Pledge to Care for Creation campaign, which launched March 29 and runs through Easter, with the goal of collecting at least 1,000 pledges by April 22, Earth Day.Discussion of these pledges figured prominently at the House of Bishops meeting in March, when a number of bishops committed to spreading the word to their dioceses. Such efforts seem to be having their intended effect: As of this week, more than 300 Episcopalians have gone online and completed the form identifying ways they will be better caretakers of creation.“We can’t see this as a hobby. We have to see it as a vocation that we actually are called to care for this Earth,” said Olympia Bishop Greg Rickel, one of the bishops who participated last month in creating this brief video invitation to rest of the church.Rickel told Episcopal News Service in a phone interview this week that he pledged to “eat lower on the chain,” meaning less meat and more food produced closer to home, which reduces the carbon footprint tied to food transportation. He also is considering switching from a hybrid to an electric car, and he pledged to deepen his diocese’s companion relationship with a diocese in the Philippines that involves a tree-planting ministry.Kansas Bishop Cathleen Bascom, who serves on General Convention’s Task Force on Care of Creation & Environmental Racism, pledged to build on her long-time involvement in the cause of prairie restoration, and she is reducing her carbon footprint by choosing to live within walking distance of her new office after she was consecrated as bishop on March 2.Her consecration itself was a conduit for creation care advocacy. The Diocese of Kansas, at Bascom’s direction, distributed pledge forms to the hundreds of people who attended the consecration at Grace Cathedral in Topeka, even though it occurred before The Episcopal Church launched its online pledge form.Some of those attendees filled out the tear-off slip and turned it in the same day, and others have been sending them in a steady stream to the diocesan office for the past month.“People do think about this issue, and I think our particular spirituality has so much richness,” Bascom told ENS. “The Episcopal Church is such fertile ground for this movement.”General Convention in 2015 identified creation care as one of the church’s three top priorities, along with racial reconciliation and evangelism. In 2018, General Convention passed 19 environmental resolutions, including support for a national carbon tax, carbon offsets for church-related travel, ocean health and Episcopalians’ continued participation in the Paris Agreement.Under Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, the church is emphasizing its role in promoting a “loving, liberating, life-giving relationship with God” through creation care as part of the Jesus Movement.The online Pledge to Care for Creation features three parts. Participants are asked to submit one example under “Loving” for sharing the love of God’s creation, a second example under “Liberating” for standing with people being harmed by environmental injustice, and a final example under “Life-Giving” of individual actions they intend to take. Some examples include changing eating habits, increasing use of renewable energy and sharing related information with one’s congregation.“We hope people understand this is more than adding your signature to a petition,” the Rev. Melanie Mullen, director of reconciliation, justice and creation care, said in a press release announcing the campaign. “Pray with the pledge and the Reflection Guide during Lent. Think about what you love in God’s Creation, where your heart breaks over environmental injustice, and how you’d like to simplify your life.”Rickel, Bascom and other bishops also are emphasizing the Carbon Tracker that the Diocese of California is launching to give people a tangible way of measuring individual and cumulative progress toward improving the environment.California Bishop Marc Andrus, in a prior interview with ENS, described the tracker as functioning similar to how a Fitbit or other fitness watch tracks steps or calories. “This is like that, for carbon and for sustainable lifestyle choices,” Andrus said.The pledge campaign is “a great way to rally the church,” Rickel said. The news these days on climate change and other environmental issues often highlights the doom and gloom, but with so many Episcopalians taking the Pledge to Care for Creation, Rickel still sees reason for hope.“I just believe as Christians we have to live in hope,” he said. “To not live in hope is to deny our faith and to deny Jesus.”San Joaquin Bishop David Rice also is hopeful because he sees this campaign as a beginning, not as an end in itself.“This is about behavioral modification,” Rice told ENS. “I think people are becoming increasingly aware of what’s at stake here.”In his diocese, in California’s central valley, what’s at stake has a lot to do with water, or lack of it. The region has been in and out of a drought for several years, which affects the local agricultural economy.Rice pledged to bolster his diocese’s water conservation efforts and also work toward eradicating single-use water bottles. He also aims to reduce his personal carbon footprint by riding his bike more and driving less.His diocese is spreading the word about the Pledge to Care for Creation through numerous videos and promotion on social media, and as he schedules one-on-one meetings with each clergy member in the diocese during Lent, he is bringing up the pledge in every meeting.Across the diocese, “people are so wonderfully receptive in their responses, and there’s significant conversation being generated here,” Rice said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Featured Events Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By David PaulsenPosted Apr 5, 2019 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Environment & Climate Change, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME House of Bishops Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Hundreds of Episcopalians make ‘Pledge to Care for Creation’ in campaign’s first days Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Temporary suspension of ACNS’ normal output

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion News ServicePosted May 5, 2020 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, many areas of the work of the Anglican Communion Office have been temporarily suspended or curtailed – including the Anglican Communion News Service.We will continue to publish a blog profiling the province to be prayed for in the following Sunday in the Anglican Cycle of Prayer, and a weekly summary of news in a single article; but other ACNS services, including our translation services and our weekly email, have been suspended.We will continue to review the situation and resume normal service once it is appropriate to do so.Gavin DrakeDirector for CommunicationsThe Anglican Communion Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Temporary suspension of ACNS’ normal output Rector Belleville, IL Back to Press Releases Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Apopka Burglary Report

first_img Apopka Burglary Report: Week Ending – 10/16/2017The Apopka Burglary Report for the week 10/9/2017 – 10/16/2017 shows five burglaries reported in the City of Apopka.One residential burglary was reported in the 200 Block of East Myrtle Street.Four vehicle burglaries were reported in the 1400 Block of Crawford Drive, the 1900 Block of Harmon Road, the 500 Block of Jeffrey James Way, and the 1800 Block of Dunn Block Cove Drive.No burglaries were reported at businesses.Chief Michael McKinley, of the APD, tells us that many vehicle burglaries could have been prevented if everyone remembers to do just two things:Remove all valuables from your vehicleLock your car doorsThe breakdown of the burglaries reported to the Apopka Police Department last week:0 – Business1 – Residential4 – Vehicle Please enter your comment! UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSApopka Burglary ReportApopka Police DepartmentBusiness Burglary ReportResidential Burglary ReportVehicle Burglary Report Previous articleBlue Darters fall, Mustangs rise in AP Top 10 PollNext articleMortgage Rates Hold Steady Around 4% Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more